.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • 27J salutes retirees

    Thirteen veteran employees of Brighton School District 27J retired effective at the end of the school year.

        The group includes Dave Rose (Northeast Elementary), Diana Pollard (Southeast), Dorothy Wallace (Vikan Middle School), Gerald Gonzales (facilities), Jackie Walters (Brighton High School), Katherine Smith (Northeast), Linda Ott (Northeast), Margaret Wallace (Southeast), Mary Ross (Northeast), Patsy Brown (Northeast), Sheila Fossen (Southeast), Shirley Rogers (Southeast) and Karin Turner (Thimmig Elementary).

  • School notes

    Children’s

    book exchange

  • College in Colorado awards Kearney Middle School student $1,000 scholarship

    On May 21, Lizeth Villegas, a seventh-grader from Kearney Middle School, received a  $1,000 scholarship check for her courage to overcome adversity and stay on a path to finish high school and graduate from college.

        Villegas’ award-winning essay was one of only five students in Colorado selected from the more than 200 applications for this college scholarship.

  • Fitness equipment dedication Tuesday

    COMMERCE CITY – Former students of longtime Alsup Elementary physical education teacher Mr. Barthule are invited to join in the dedication of new fitness equipment at the school in his honor.    

    The dedication will be at 10 a.m., May 26, at Alsup Elementary, 7101 Birch St.     

    Barthule was a teacher at the school for 27 years and recently retired. Call Loretta Garcia at 303-287-8344.

  • PVHS academic awards go to 206 students

        HENDERSON — Two hundred six students were honored for their academic achievement – some with as many as five awards – during the Prairie View High School academic awards night,

        The PVHS Thunderhawk award honors one female and one male student, each of whom have shown conscientious and determined effort in academic areas. These students demonstrate the potential to become outstanding leaders.

  • Registration begins for Front Range

        WESTMINSTER – Registration for summer semester classes at Front Range Community College is under way at all campuses and online.

        The summer semester begins June 1. The schedule is available on campus, online at www.frontrange.edu, and at selected sites in Adams and Broomfield counties.

      

    Read the entire story in this week's Commerce City Sentinel Express – www.lcni5.com/cgi-bin/c2circ.cgi

  • Kindergarten roundups scheduled in Adams 14

    COMMERCE CITY – Adams 14 School District parents begin the process this month of enrolling their children in preschool and kindergarten for the 2009-10 school year.

        Children who will be 5-years-old by Oct. 1, 2009, are eligible for kindergarten classes. Screenings will be Saturday, April 26, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Adams 14 Child Care Center, 5650 Bowen Court, Commerce City. Parents must schedule a screening appointment in advance. All children in the district must be screened to enroll in kindergarten next year.

  • Aims, Front Range eye possible higher-ed cuts

    Update

    DENVER – The recent moves by the Legislature to cut as much as $300 million more from higher education are drawing the attention of Aims Community College and other state community colleges.

    The Joint Budget Committee voted to take the $300 million to help close the state’s budget gap. Wednesday morning, the Legislature pulled a plan to take some money from Pinnacol Assurance, a firm that deals with workers’ compensation insurance in the state but over which the state of Colorado does not have control.

  • 27J kindergarten round-up set for April 2

    BRIGHTON — Parents of children who are going to be 5 years old by Sept. 15 may register them for kindergarten for the next school year.

    Parents are invited to attend the neighborhood school’s Kindergarten Round-Up April 2.

  • Front Range educator uses charisma, wit to make math appealing

    BRIGHTON – Jason Burke has had the best and worst jobs.

    When he graduated from college with a degree in mechanical engineering, he went to work for a high-profile engineering firm.

    “Stuck in a bloody office,” Burke says, his unmistakable Northern English accent purring from his tongue. “People smoking in there all day. I’m thinking, ‘What the hell am I doing ‘ere (sic)?’

    “That was it,” Burke says, pursing his lips to create a whooshing sound. “Never to be seen again, vanished.”