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Features

  •  The roots of violence take many forms in director David Gordon Green’s stellar Southern crime drama, “Joe.”

    First and foremost, there’s the near-comical levels to which the eponymous lead (played by Nicolas Cage) goes to in trying to prevent himself from going over the edge when dealing with others — supremely self-aware of his propensity for going off on someone, whether it’s a police officer or someone close to him.

     

  •  Anyone who comes away from viewing director Errol Morris’ “The Unknown Known” without a keen appreciation for how good a liar former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld is, they surely suffer from what the doc’s central figure refers to as a “failure of imagination.”

     

  •  Brad McHargue

    Film Writer


    ESTES PARK — In 2013, I was lucky enough to attend the inaugural Stanley Film Festival, held in Estes Park at the allegedly haunted Stanley Hotel.

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    Aaron Cole

    Auto Columnist

     

    Behold the 2013 Bentley Continental GT Speed Convertible. I won’t bury the lead, so here it is: This car costs $272,220.  

     

    From this point forward, I’ll attempt to justify that price.

  • Take an otherwise awful story about a guy failing in business, romance and family matters, and cast Kevin Costner. Make it a sports movie, because he’s good at those. Plaster it with enough logos and stars to turn it into a massive advertisement for the National Football League. Then sit back and let everything work its way out.

     

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    Brad McHargue

    Following its premiere at the Toronto International Film Fest and its subsequent screening at SXSW this past March, Mike Flanagan’s “Oculus” has received almost universal critical acclaim.

    As a result, I went in expecting something great, and as loath as I am to say it, I would have walked out if I wasn’t tasked with writing this review. Did we all see the same movie?

  • A patch of dead grass on an otherwise lush lawn can be a frustrating eyesore for homeowners. Whether lawn care is your passion or just something you do to maintain the value of your home, dead grass can be exasperating.

  • It’s the season for home improvements, but dry weather conditions can shift priority projects this spring. Water conservation is on everyone’s mind, challenging local DIYers to get creative and inspiring The Home Depot to host a nationwide series of Water Conservation Workshops on Saturday, April 26.

    The Home Depot’s local Workshop leader can share know-how about clever ways to stay water-conscious this year, including:

  • What do you do with all the power and prestige that money can buy?

    While that’s the central question underpinning the story of “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” it’s also a valid query for the Marvel movie universe.

     

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    Aaron Cole

    Auto Columnist

     

    The 2015 Chrysler 200 really starts in two places: on fingertips reaching from the driver’s seat and, perhaps more importantly, a blank sheet of paper.

     

  • Summer Quillen and Antonio Montoya, of Commerce City, announce the birth of a son, Mason James Montoya. Mason was born March 14, 2014, at Platte Valley Medical Center in Brighton, weighing 7 pounds, 3 ounces, and measuring 21 inches.

    Grandparents are Melony Quillen, of Commerce City, Guy Dunning, of Cañon City, Shurlisa Jones, of Northglenn, and Ben Montoya, of Northglenn. Great-grandparents are Pamela and Kenneth Quillen, of Commerce City.

  • Liliana and Sergio Hernandez, of Brighton, announce the birth of a daughter, Dorismar Anahi Hernandez. Dorismar was born March 14, 2014, at Platte Valley Medical Center in Brighton, weighing 8 pounds, 9.5 ounces, and measuring 20.5 inches.

    Grandparents are Audelio and Paula Morales, of Brighton, and Alfredo Hernandez and Gloria Cisneros, of Mexico. Great-grandfather is Gregorio Salomon, of Longmont.

    Dorismar joins her sister, Karyme Hernandez, 19 months.

     

  • Sometimes a humble and earnest attempt at chronicling the life of a historical figure will seem helplessly lacking up against the totality of that person’s legacy.

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    Aaron Cole

    Auto Columnist

     

    You get the feeling Volvo is like a new lottery winner. After years of Spartan interior details and perhaps-necessary minimalistic presentation (some of which was very pretty), the Swedish car company hung a Monet next to the black-light poster.

     

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    Brad McHargue

    Film Critic

     

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    Aaron Cole

    Auto Columnist

     

    First, a confession: I’m a bit of a Europhile. Not everything is better across the pond, but many things are. 

    Food is better in Germany. Wine is better in France. Italy does wine and food better than both. At least the Brits have soccer.

     

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    Aaron Cole

    Auto Columnist

     

    If, in five years, the polar vortex proves us all wrong and Kissimmee, Fla. becomes the new Aspen, consider the Toyota 4Runner a contender for “Car of the New Ice Age.” Oh, and pass the whale-oil lamp. It’s cold in here.

  • If director Wes Anderson’s previous film “Moonrise Kingdom” was the dummies’ guide to his unique cinematic aesthetics and peculiarities, his latest film — “The Grand Budapest Hotel” — is a greatest hits album.

  • To deride “Need for Speed” as “just another video game movie” would be unfair.

    Most video games these days have better writing, characters and action than “Need for Speed.” While I’ve not had the pleasure of trying my controller-gripping hand at the NFS game series, I refuse to believe they’d be less enjoyable than the film that bears its name opening this week.

     

  • If director Wes Anderson's previous film “Moonrise Kingdom” was the dummies' guide to his unique cinematic aesthetics and peculiarities, his latest film – “The Grand Budapest Hotel” – is a greatest hits album.

    It's almost as though he's expected a chorus of critics to push him to explore new territory and ditch the sometimes stuffy, other times pastel but always intriguing ways he crafts his films — and "Grand Budapest" is as strong a counterpunch to those opinions as I can imagine from Anderson.