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Education

  • Kindergarten roundups scheduled in Adams 14

    COMMERCE CITY – Adams 14 School District parents begin the process this month of enrolling their children in preschool and kindergarten for the 2009-10 school year.

        Children who will be 5-years-old by Oct. 1, 2009, are eligible for kindergarten classes. Screenings will be Saturday, April 26, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Adams 14 Child Care Center, 5650 Bowen Court, Commerce City. Parents must schedule a screening appointment in advance. All children in the district must be screened to enroll in kindergarten next year.

  • Aims, Front Range eye possible higher-ed cuts

    Update

    DENVER – The recent moves by the Legislature to cut as much as $300 million more from higher education are drawing the attention of Aims Community College and other state community colleges.

    The Joint Budget Committee voted to take the $300 million to help close the state’s budget gap. Wednesday morning, the Legislature pulled a plan to take some money from Pinnacol Assurance, a firm that deals with workers’ compensation insurance in the state but over which the state of Colorado does not have control.

  • 27J kindergarten round-up set for April 2

    BRIGHTON — Parents of children who are going to be 5 years old by Sept. 15 may register them for kindergarten for the next school year.

    Parents are invited to attend the neighborhood school’s Kindergarten Round-Up April 2.

  • Front Range educator uses charisma, wit to make math appealing

    BRIGHTON – Jason Burke has had the best and worst jobs.

    When he graduated from college with a degree in mechanical engineering, he went to work for a high-profile engineering firm.

    “Stuck in a bloody office,” Burke says, his unmistakable Northern English accent purring from his tongue. “People smoking in there all day. I’m thinking, ‘What the hell am I doing ‘ere (sic)?’

    “That was it,” Burke says, pursing his lips to create a whooshing sound. “Never to be seen again, vanished.”

  • Primrose students make a difference

    Hundreds of Commerce City kids will enjoy books with their families thanks to Primose School.

        Nine kindergarteners from the reunion Primrose School visited Community Health Services March 16. Twenty-three more kindergarteners from Stapleton Primrose stopped by March 23.

  • Jason's Meaningful Jacket

    HENDERSON – Prairie View High School football coach Rocky Schneider hopes that the lessons his players learn on the field carry over to their everyday life. He wants each team member to gain a sense of the importance of quality of character.

    Jason Sample is a 16-year-old student at Prairie View. He is also the football team’s manager. Schneider readily admits just how special Jason is. He is one of the team’s most dedicated supporters.

  • Snack cart brings fruit, veggies to North, South

    Only two days into a new program sponsored by the USDA, Benita Lucio-Munoz, manager at School District 27J’s South Elementary School kitchen, is greeted with “Yeahs!” from students, as she brings baby carrots to their room for a mid-morning snack.

  • Student board showcased at annual CASB convention

    Larry Quintana

    Special to the Express

    Although not the first school district in the state to have a student board of education, Adams 14 has assumed a leadership role in getting the concept out to other districts.

  • Hooked on the symphony

    BRIGHTON — “Thank you for playing that beautiful music.  It has opened my eyes to a new style of music,” wrote Paul Montoya after experiencing the Colorado Symphony Orchestra’s educational program, “The Planets and the Sea” conducted by associate conductor Scott O’ Neil. 

  • Larger school districts less likely to meet AYP

    FORT LUPTON — It’s usually the big school districts that bring home the tallest team trophies.  But when it comes to the percentage of students making adequate yearly progress in reading and math, the smallest districts in the state, those with 373 students or less, finished first.

        The students in only 78 districts, less than half of Colorado’s 183 school districts, made AYP this year.  Not one of the 50 districts with more than 2,000 students made the cut, but 36 of the smallest 50 districts did.