27J’s graduation rate increases for a fourth year

Staff reports
Posted 1/18/22

The graduation rate in 27J Schools increased for a fourth year in a row, according to a press statement. The rate increased two percent to 88.2 percent, an all-time high, said the district. “This …

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27J’s graduation rate increases for a fourth year

Posted

The graduation rate in 27J Schools increased for a fourth year in a row, according to a press statement.

The rate increased two percent to 88.2 percent, an all-time high, said the district.

“This is proof positive that our efforts to keep kids in school and on track to graduate on time are working,” 27J Schools Superintendent

Chris Fiedler said in the statement. “Earning that high-school diploma is critical to any student’s success whether they decide to go to college, to a trade school or immediately enter the workforce. It’s the key to more and better opportunities.”

The district’s statement said 27J Schools has the highest graduation rate among Adams County school districts. The statement also said it posted gains among its Hispanic and white students. Hispanic students netted an increased graduation rate of nearly 4 percent to 86.7 percent, which earns 27J Schools the highest Hispanic student graduation rate in the Denver metro area. White students also increased their graduation rate 2.3 percentage points to 90.6 percent. The district’s graduation rate exceeds the state average in every ethnic group, the statement said.

Three Brighton high schools – Brighton High School, Eagle Ridge Academy and Prairie View High School – earned graduation rates of more than 90 percent, the district said. These schools, plus the district’s alternative high school, Innovations and Options, all saw improvement over last year’s graduation rate. The district’s newest high school, Riverdale Ridge, posted its first graduation rate at 93.8 percent this year.

27J Schools’ graduation rate now has exceeded the state average for four consecutive years.

“Improving a large system like ours takes a lot of teamwork and dedication. I have to thank the class of 2021, their parents and all of Team 27J for this historic accomplishment,” Fiedler said. “This is the highest graduation rate in the district’s history.”

27J Schools includes the city of Brighton, and parts of Thornton, Commerce City, Lochbuie, Aurora, Broomfield and Weld County. The district’s statement said new families are moving into the district at a record pace, and student enrollment numbers are increasing by about 500 to 800 students per year over the last five years alone.

In 2000, the district served 5,000 students while today, it has about 20,300 students enrolled. That number represents a diverse student population, according to the district  --  57.7 percent Hispanic students, 42 percent white students, 3.2 percent Asian students, 2.1 percent black students, 3.6 percent students of two or more races, 0.3 of 1 percent American Indian students and 0.2 of 1 percent native Hawaiian students. 

“We’re doing a much better job of helping students find skills and subjects that really interest them and linking them to STEM and technical education.

In those programs, students can do internships in the community and get hands-on training to explore their interests and see how they can make a career out of what they truly like to do,” 27J Schools Chief Academic Officer Will Pierce said. “That’s a powerful incentive to stay in school when you see career options you’d really enjoy.”

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